Vision Screening Specialist

Cardinal Pediatrics

Pediatrics located in Lowell, MA & Chelmsford, MA

Children often don't show obvious signs of vision problems, and at a young age, they can't recognize that their vision isn't normal. That's why the experienced team at Cardinal Pediatrics offers vision screening, using age-appropriate tests that are essential for discovering if your child has trouble seeing. If you have questions or concerns about your child's vision, call the office in Lowell or Chelmsford, Massachusetts, or book an appointment online today.

Vision Screening Q & A

When should my child have vision screening?

Your baby's vision develops over the first year. Around 3 months old, they should follow a moving object with their eyes. At 4-5 months, they begin to develop normal vision, including the ability to see colors, but may not have full vision until their first birthday.

Cardinal Pediatrics can do vision screening at every infant care and well-child visit. After the age of 5, children should have a yearly vision screening.

What signs indicate my child needs vision screening?

If your child doesn't meet the following guidelines, they should have a vision screening:

3 months old

Your baby should be able to follow an object with their eyes and make steady eye contact.

4 months old

At 4 months, their eyes should not regularly cross inward or drift outward.

At all ages

Children need immediate vision screening if you notice:

  • Misaligned eyes (cross-eyed)
  • White color in the pupil
  • Eye fluttering from side to side or up and down
  • Eye pain or itchiness
  • Eye redness (that doesn't go away in a few days)
  • Crusting or pus
  • Watery eyes
  • Drooping eyelids
  • Sensitivity to light

As your child gets older, they may complain about not being able to see clearly. However, they don't know that something is wrong with their vision at a young age.

What type of vision screening tests might my child need?

The earliest screenings check whether their eyes follow an object, or if they blink or their pupil size changes in response to a light.

Other vision screening tests include:

Visually evoked response testing

Infants can be connected to a monitor that records electrical activity in the brain as they're exposed to lights.

Cover and uncover test

During this test, your provider covers one eye while watching for eye movement and alignment in the uncovered eye.

Visual acuity tests

When your child is around the age of 3, your provider can use charts to measure near and distant vision. This is similar to the tests adults have using charts with letters, but the charts have pictures for children.

Color testing

Your provider can screen color vision in preschoolers.

School-aged testing

By the time your child enters school, their vision screening and eye tests can be done using the same tools as adults.

If you have questions or concerns about your child's vision, call Cardinal Pediatrics, or book an appointment online today.